A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

Nigel Ashley v Health and Safety Executive

30 November 2011

A partner in Ashley’s of Yeovil, a precision engineering business, has been fined after an 18-year-old employee suffered four severed fingers while working on a milling machine.

Neil Brown v Health and Safety Executive

21 January 2011

Neil Brown, trading as High View Services, was fined in November 2010 for failure to provide employees with adequate information, instruction and training in proper procedures when dealing with asbestos.

Nationwide Building Contractors Ltd v Health and Safety Executive

20 July 2010

In 2008, Nationwide Building Contractors Ltd was contracted to refurbish a country club near Darlington. When Health and Safety Executive (HSE) inspectors inspected the site, they discovered that work was being carried out without adequate checks for asbestos or asbestos-containing materials (ACMs).

New Southern Railway Ltd v Quinn [2006] IRLR 266, EAT

19 April 2007

Mrs Q was employed by N as a station manager support clerk. She was offered promotion on a three-month trial period. During this period, she was told that a recommendation would be made that the promotion should be confirmed. She then discovered that she was pregnant.

Naylor v Volex Group plc (2004) HSB 331, CA

23 March 2007

N was employed by V to make up wiring harnesses for motor vehicles. After April 1997 this work involved soldering, an operation which was potentially hazardous because soldering gave off fumes containing colophony, a toxic substance. N claimed that exposure to colophony caused her to develop industrial asthma and she claimed compensation on the basis of breach of the employer’s duty under regulations 6 and 7 of the 1994 Regulations. At first instance, her claim succeeded. The employers appealed to the Court of Appeal.

Nurse v Morganite Crucible Ltd [1989] 2 WLR 82, HL

23 March 2007

The defendant had demolished two large driers which contained asbestos, but had not provided respiratory protective equipment; did not store the broken parts in suitable receptacles; and failed to keep that part of the factory where the parts were being broken up reasonably clean. It was charged with offences under the Factories Act 1961 and under the Asbestos Regulations 1969, and convicted by Worcester magistrates. Its appeal to the Crown Court was dismissed, but its subsequent appeal to the Divisional Court succeeded. The Divisional Court granted leave for the prosecution to appeal to the House of Lords.