Employee Factsheet: Discharge to Water

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Any discharge of chemicals, solids or even heat to a watercourse constitutes pollution. The environment has the capacity to receive small amounts of polluting material and this is controlled by authorisation from the environmental regulators, which are the Environment Agency in England, Natural Resources Wales, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

Discharge to Water: In-depth

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Effluents resulting from non-domestic activities (trade effluents) may be discharged to the sewerage system or in some circumstances directly to inland freshwaters, coastal waters or territorial waters. In Scotland, water bodies subject to regulation are described as the water environment. Planned discharges are regulated using authorisations (eg environmental permits or discharge consents) issued by the environmental regulators or water companies. The authorisations will contain conditions, eg maximum concentrations of polluting substances. Standalone discharges to water, and discharges to sewer, are covered by different legislative regimes, however where a discharge to sewer forms part of a wider operation, this activity may be covered by the relevant authorisation.

Discharge to Water Policy

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

In England and Wales, discharges to inland freshwater, coastal water, groundwater and relevant territorial waters are regulated under the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2016 (EPR).

Discharge to Water: Quick Facts

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Water pollution incidents can be the subject of criminal prosecutions under the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010, the Water Environment (Controlled Activities) (Scotland) Regulations 2011 (CAR) in Scotland and the Water (Northern Ireland) Order 1999. Regulated Water Bodies

How to Recognise Slavery on a Construction Site

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

There are any number of circumstances that might arise to someone being a victim of forced labour or slavery, and every situation is likely to be different. However, although there are no set criteria that outline what to look out for, or a clear description of how those in forced labour might behave, there are some indicators that site supervisors and others on site should look out for.

How to Write a Modern Slavery and Trafficking Statement

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

A statement should include all the elements suggested by s.54(5) of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. It should also be written clearly, according to principles of Plain English, and published in the English language, although it can also be available in other languages.

Modern Slavery: In-depth

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Modern slavery, which encompasses forced or compulsory labour and human trafficking, is a heinous crime still taking place in the UK. Perpetrators exploit their victims, using them as a commodity for economic gain. It is often hidden in plain sight, taking place in workplaces such as car washes, construction sites, fields and factories across the country.