Applications for job vacancies through social media

28 August 2019

A very short time ago, jobs were advertised in the local or national newspaper, at significant expense, and a candidate would post his or her completed application form and curriculum vitae (CV) hoping that the Royal Mail would deliver this paper copy before the deadline. Every stage of this process has changed significantly and remarkably quickly. The question, asks Gudrun Limbrick, is are employers keeping up with the myriad ways in which potential candidates now communicate about important matters such as jobs?

Should recruitment plans target unemployed parents?

27 February 2019

Recruitment strategies implemented to supplement the existing workforce, or replace those who leave, are some of the key processes that will be overseen by managers. After all, business success is heavily influenced by the performance of employees. To fill over 3000 new roles created by expansion plans, the hospitality chain Travelodge is implementing a new internal recruitment plan targeting unemployed parents — is this a workable strategy for all organisations?

The benefits of a returner scheme

20 February 2019

The Government helped raise the profile of returner schemes when it pledged £5 million in 2017’s Budget to create hundreds of returner roles on programmes within the civil service, social care and teaching. Focus on this talent pool has accordingly increased, with professional networks now available for returners to join online, helping them to source opportunities or receive guidance and advice. Many large and small business are now operating returner programmes at various stages throughout the year, including those ran by Mastercard, O2 and the Bank of England.

Recruitment problems and “gut feeling”

7 January 2019

Gudrun Limbrick looks at a recent survey that has found that “gut feeling” is still the most common reason for hiring one person rather than another, despite all the tools available to help with recruitment and considers whether this represents a real problem or the best way of finding a suitable team member.

Achieving and maintaining an optimal staff structure

6 December 2017

If business never changed — same products, steady order book — staffing requirements would not be a problem. We would recognise the exact number of people and skills we needed and, having got them, recruit only to replace leavers. But business is not like that. Order books rise and fall, markets change as do products, new skills become needed, old ones lose their value, and as a result our needs for people and their skills are in constant flux says Bob Patchett.

Brexit and recruitment

15 November 2017

Gudrun Limbrick looks at trends and developments in recruitment since the vote to leave the EU.

Recruitment and the probation period

7 June 2017

Many employers engage new employees on a probation, or trial, period as a matter of course, to give them time to determine whether or not the recruit is satisfactory. In some ways this is a good idea, but not if used as a substitute for sound recruitment practice says Bob Patchett.

Giving references — some problems considered

2 February 2016

A good reference from a former or current employer can mean the difference between getting a new job or not getting it. It can be worth its weight in gold. For some, the pursuit of a good reference can mean taking up voluntary work simply to clock up the hours and the experience so that the employer can be cited as a referee. However, more and more, employers are declining to give references for fear of claims of falsehood being made against them. Gudrun Limbrick considers if fears of potential reference givers are justified and where this leaves job hunters who have no one to vouch for them.

Getting the mix right: Safeguarding yourself against inequality claims

16 December 2015

What is the right mix? And what is that about a claim? Let’s look at the last question first. An inequality claim would be made by an employee who asserts that you, the employer, did something that was in breach of the Equality Act, an important piece of legislation that protects individuals or groups of people who may be discriminated against or treated worse than others in similar circumstances, says Bob Patchett.

The demise of the recruitment interview

31 July 2015

The basic structure of recruitment, on the face of it, has changed little since we first came up with the idea of not simply giving jobs to our children in the order in which they were born. We make these important decisions based on the application letter, form or CV and the interview. The process has got tighter as our concerns for fairness and equality have increased and we have a greater tendency to hand all or part of the process to agencies but, whether the process has become any more effective or any less stressful for all concerned is another matter entirely, says Gudrun Limbrick.